Ethnobotanical Study of Traditional Medicinal Plants ofv Gololcha District Bale Zone of Oromia Region , Ethiopia

Ethnobotanical Study of Traditional Medicinal Plants ofv Gololcha District Bale Zone of Oromia Region , Ethiopia

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Title: Ethnobotanical Study of Traditional Medicinal Plants ofv Gololcha District Bale Zone of Oromia Region , Ethiopia
Author: Mekonnen, Abebe; Dr. Meseret, Chemdessa
Abstract: Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants was conducted to document the indigenous plant-based medical knowledge of people in Gololcha District, south eastern Ethiopia from January to May, 2013. A total of 60 informants (age≥30) were selected to collect information on medicinal plant use from eight sampled kebeles. Of these, 14 key informants were selected purposively based on recommendation by local elders and authorities. The rest were selected randomly. Data were collected using semi-structured questionnaires and interviews, field observations and group discussions. Informant consensus factor (ICF) and fidelity level were calculated to assess the agreement of informants on the medicinal value of plants. A total of 70 plant species distributed in 65 genera and 38 families were collected and identified. Out of the collected 70 medicinal plants of the study area, 47 species (67.14%) were used against 38 human ailments, 17 species (24.28%) were used against livestock ailments and the remaining 6 species (8.57%) were used to treat both human and livestock ailments. From the total medicinal plant species, 31 were herbs, followed by 18 species of shrubs, 11 species of trees, and 10 species of climbers. The most frequently used plant parts were leaves (40%) followed by roots (21.33%). The most widely used method of preparation was crushing (30.86%) of the different plant parts. The common route of administration recorded was oral (50.61%) followed by dermal (22.22%) and through the eye (6.17%). Disease categories such as urine and placental retention and febrile illness, cough and common cold had higher ICF values, suggesting high incidence of these diseases in the study area and agreement of people on their remedies. Agricultural expansion, firewood collection, and use of plants for construction were reported as major threats to plants of the study area. In order to protect biodiversity erosion and loss of indigenous knowledge, local communities must be taught and involved in conservation and management of plant resources and their indigenous knowledge.
Description: 58p.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/3253
Date: 2013-11


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