Determinants of Participation in Soil Fertility Management Practices by Smallholder Farmers: The Case of Gurawa and Haromaya Districts, East Hararge Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia

Determinants of Participation in Soil Fertility Management Practices by Smallholder Farmers: The Case of Gurawa and Haromaya Districts, East Hararge Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia

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Title: Determinants of Participation in Soil Fertility Management Practices by Smallholder Farmers: The Case of Gurawa and Haromaya Districts, East Hararge Zone, Oromia, Ethiopia
Author: Muhammed, Shako
Abstract: In Ethiopia, agriculture is the main economic activity which employs the majority of its population; however it is known for its low productivity. The depletion of soil fertility is among the main factors that contributed to low performance of the sector. Farmers use different soil fertility management practices to improve the fertility of their soil. To enhance utilization of different soil fertility management practices there is a need to identify determinants of soil fertility management practices by smallholder farmers. Therefore, this study aims at identifying the determinants of soil fertility management practices by smallholder farm households in Gurawa and Haromaya districts, East Hararghe zone, Oromia national regional state. The study used cross sectional data collected from 200 randomly selected sample households from the two districts. Descriptive statistics and econometric models were used to analyze the data. Descriptive statistics were used to identify different soil fertility management practices such as use of inorganic fertilizer, organic inputs and soil erosion control measures at farm level. Multivariate probit model was run to identify factors influencing households’ use of different soil fertility management practices. Results of the multivariate probit showed that the likelihood of the household to use fertilizer (DAP), farmyard manure, compost, soil bund and stone bund were 78.25%, 72.43%, 37.68%, 77.22% and 46.04% respectively. The result also showed that the joint probability to use all soil fertility management practices is 6.84% and the joint probability of failure to use all the soil fertility options is only 0.31%. Results of the correlation between the error terms on multivariate probit model indicate that some soil fertility management practices are substitutes or compete (negative sign) for the same scarce resources and some are complements (positive sign). Multivariate probit model results also mirrored that sex, household size, number of plots, plot area, agro-ecology, district, livestock holding, extension contact, average distance of the plot, slope of the plot, off/non farm income, credit and irrigation use have significant effect on use of different soil fertility management practices. These findings hinted to the policy makers the need for formulation and implementation of policies targeting the above mentioned factors to enable framers improve the fertility of their productivity thereby achieving food security at various levels.
Description: 113p.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2889
Date: 2015-11


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